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Friends of the Coeur d'Alene Trails

Other Idaho Panhandle Bicycle Trails

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Other Documented Rides

The following side trips have been carefully documented by members of the Friends of the Coeur d'Alene Trails. get Adobe Reader for free! They now exist as Adobe Acrobat (PDF) documents with a map on one page and directions by mileage on another page. They were converted from the original MicroSoft Word documents on October 31, 2011, to the more universal PDF format by Ed Renkey, the author of the original documents.

You may download the following rides for free:

Other rides will be available as they are documented by our Trails Committee and vetted by the organization. This procedure is meant to insure that private property is not inadvertently crossed by enthusiastic trail riders. Trails under consideration may be accessed by staff.

Please feel free to contact us with your observations and suggestions on these trails. Better still, become a member of our Idaho not-for-profit organization, and help us bring you even more maps for your biking enjoyment.

# 1 ("flat")     These beautiful loop trips involve Anderson and Thompson Lakes near Harrison. The mileage in the directions is based on riding around both lakes, a total of 16.2 miles. Each lake could also be circumnavigated as a separate ride. The directions describe how to ride for each option. A bicycle with wide tires is recommended since the roads around both lakes are packed gravel.
map and directions by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
(137 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 2 ("moderate")     The historically interesting Tamerack Ridge Route begins near the oldest building in Idaho, the Cataldo Mission. Canyon Road, Tamarack Ridge Road, and River Road have more hills and less shade than you will encounter along the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. If you are starting from Cataldo late in the day, you might want to ride in the opposite direction so that you are on the trail when it is hotter, and on the roads when it is cooler. The 18.7 mile loop could also begin at the Bull Run Trailhead.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
(298 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 3 ("difficult-hybrid")     The expert 15.8 mile Dudley Saddle Loop is for the mountain bike rider who loves to climb. Most of the ride is on dirt or gravel roads. The first five miles consists of a 1450-foot climb. Of course, the next five miles are all down hill to the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. The last five miles are on the Trail between Dudley and the Black Rock Trailhead. The only restroom is at the Bull Run Trailhead.
map and directions by Larry and Echo Halley
(780 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 4 ("difficult-road")     The expert 52.6 mile Dobson Pass Loop is for the experienced paved road bike rider who loves to climb. The ride starts and ends on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. It leaves the Trail at the Wallace Trailhead and continues on two-lane paved roads over Dobson Pass (elevation 4090 feet) and then returns to the Trail at the Enaville Trailhead. The first 6 miles out of Wallace is a steep climb to the pass. Of course, the next 29 miles are all down hill until you reach the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes again.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
(249 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 5 ("difficult-mountain")     The Beefcamp Jewel Loop is a rigorous mountain bike adventure through dense forests. It begins just off the Trail in Osburn, and climbs 2240 feet in 10.5 miles, following Beefcamp Trail #102 up to a crows foot junction with Jewel Trail #103, which drops rapidly back to town.
map and directions by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
(275 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 6 ("moderate")     The 16.2 mile East Portal to Saltese Loop is for those who have already done the Route of the Hiawatha and are looking for something similar, but FREE. This ride starts at the East Portal of the Taft Tunnel and goes in the other direction! You follow the Milwaukee Road railbed east to the town of Saltese, 9 miles away and 700 feet lower in elevation. The return ride is uphill along the Northern Pacific railbed, adjacent to I-90. If you continue west on the Northern Pacific Railroad trail, rather than returning to the East Portal at Taft, you will arrive at Lookout Pass, where you have the choice of two routes down to Mullan and the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes.
map and directions by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
(1,239 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 7 ("moderate")     The 21.5 mile Pearson Avery Figure Eight is ANOTHER ride for those who have already done the Route of the Hiawatha and are looking for something similar, but FREE. This ride starts at the Route of the Hiawatha Pearson Trailhead. The trailhead can be reached via the Moon Pass Road (NFD 456) from either Wallace or Avery. This can also be a continuation of a ride on the Route of the Hiawatha. The ride follows the Old Milwaukee Scenic/Alternate Route to Avery, and returns to the Pearson Trailhead on the Moon Pass Road. The Moon Pass Road from the Pearson Trailhead to Avery is the abandoned railroad right-of-way of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Puget Sound Railway (Note the initials on the tunnel portals). Riders will lose and gain back about 700 feet of elevation as they travel the packed dirt roads.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey and Larry Halley
(781 KB; last revision on September 24, 2010, by Ed Renkey)
# 8 ("moderate-mountain")     The CCC Road - Wall Road Loop is a 13.4 mile mixture of flat and steep terrain that each year, on the Summer Equinox, becomes the venue of a bicycle event that combines the ride with a benefit and BBQ. More information is shown below.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
(1,511 KB; last revision on February 19, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 9 ("moderate-mountain")     Enhancement and promotion of the NorPac Trail that joins the end of the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes to the beginning of the Route of the Hiawatha, 22.4 miles away, has been a goal of this organization since its beginning. In 2004, we were awarded a $21K grant to provide a vault toilet, picnic tables and interpretive signs along this multi-use Northern Pacific railbed. Although the trail follows a paved country road for the first four miles, a mountain bike or other bike with at least 700C-32 tires is needed for the rest of the ride.
More information and photos are presented elsewhere on this website.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
(824 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 10 ("expert-mountain")     Here is another way to enjoy the NorPac Trail that involves a bit more adventure... and exercise. This Wallace to Lookout Pass and Back trip starts across from the Wallace Visitor's Center, just off I-90 at Exit 61. You will climb AND descend 2495 feet on this 36.0 mile ride. The first and last 10 miles on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes and a country road is easy, and the NorPac Trail up to Lookout Pass is a multi-use dirt road, so the adventure part begins at the Pass when you get on single track trail that descends 4 miles through a cedar and pine forest. The single track is very steep in places.
More information and photos are presented elsewhere on this website.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
(221 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 11 ("easy-road")     The Kellogg Silverton Loop is potentially four different road bike loops that begin and end at the Kellogg Trailhead on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. If you ride all the way to Silverton, you will have climbed ~400 feet in little over 9 miles. On your return from Silverton, you will pass by a grocery store in Osburn.
  • Elizabeth Park Loop: 3 miles
  • Big Creek Loop: 7 miles
  • Gene Day Park Loop: 11 miles
  • Silverton Loop: 18 miles
map and directions by Ed Renkey
(185 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 12 ("easy-road")     The Pine Creek Cataldo Loop is an easy 12.0 mile ride that starts by going west on Silver Valley Road from the Pine Creek Trailhead through Pinehurst and Kingston to Cataldo. Riders return along the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes, perhaps stopping at the Enaville Resort for a satisfying meal in an historic building.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
(288 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 13 ("easy-hybrid")     The Pine Creek Loops compliment the Kellogg Silverton Loop (# 11) in that all routes begin and end at the Kellogg Trailhead, just off I-90 at Exit 51. In the three loops described here, you begin by riding west on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes, rather than east.
  • CIA Loop: 4 miles
  • Pine Creek Loop: 10 miles
  • Pine Creek Loop with a climb (~ 250 feet) to Page: 12 miles
All three loops contain a 2 mile section between the CIA and I-90 that has some pavement, but is mostly packed gravel. All but the last couple of hundred feet can be ridden with tires as skinny as 700C-32.
map and directions by Ed Renkey
(273 KB; last revision on January 18, 2008, by Ed Renkey)
# 14 ("easy-mountain")     The 23.6 mile Pearson to Marble Creek is ANOTHER ride for those who have already done the Route of the Hiawatha and are looking for something similar, but FREE. This all-downhill ride starts at the Route of the Hiawatha Pearson Trailhead. The trailhead can be reached via the Moon Pass Road (NFD 456) from either Wallace or Avery. This can also be a continuation of a ride down the Route of the Hiawatha. The ride follows the Old Milwaukee Scenic/Alternate Route 10.8 miles, past a newly renovated campground on the North Fork of the Saint Joe River, to Avery (on ATV-wide trail), and then continues another 12.8 miles along the wide Saint Joe River to the Interpretive Center at Marble Creek.
original map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
(last cue sheet revision on September 25, 2010, by Ed Renkey, file = 389 KB;         map enhanced by Alan Crockett of Idaho Falls, August 2011, and incorporated into package on September 12, 2011, by Ed, file now = 979 KB)
# 15 ("easy-mountain")     The 33.8 mile route from Marble Creek to Saint Maries completes the 300K Bitterroot Loop mentioned on the main Old Milwaukee Road page. This ride starts at the Marble Creek Historical Site that is 35 miles east of St. Maries on the St. Joe River Road. The Historical Site features accessible display shelters, 8 picnic sites, vault toilets, and potable water. Attractions include displays of early 1900s logging, photos, artifacts, and a replica logging flume. This bicycle route and country road, which follows the Old Milwaukee railroad right-of-way, is not paved. The use of mountain bicycles or hybrids is therfore recommended. At one point, a decision about how to get past a barricaded bridge must be made; two choices are presented.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
(2.13 MB; created on January 5, 2011, by Ed Renkey)
    # 16 ("moderate-road")     The 7.0 mile route from Wallace to Burke takes the rider back in time along a paved country road. This ride will take you through several deserted mining towns on the way to the largest one at Burke. At one time, 5000 people lived in seven mining towns along this narrow canyon. The road is fairly smooth with long sweeping curves and lightly traveled. There is a 1000 ft elevation gain in this 7 mile ride. The climb is steady, but not difficult. At one time the Union Pacific and Northern Pacific ran standard gauge rails up this canyon beside a narrow gauge railroad. The boom town of Burke had these rail lines running down main street.
map, directions and photos by Ed Renkey
(1.20 MB; created on June 1, 2013, by Ed Renkey)

googleearth_download If you have the FREE Google Earth program installed, you may take a tour from Wallace up Burke Canyon past the lost mining towns of Gem, Frisco, Black Bear, Yellow Dog, Cornwall, Mace and Burke, to finally circle above the Glidden Lakes on the Montana border. Take flight at wallace2burke.kml. Clicking on some of the old mine sites will display historical photos.

Return to top of available maps

click to enlarge map, courtesy of Ed Renkey

About 150 men, women, and children gather each year at the Enaville Resort on the Summer Equinox, June 21, to "Bridge the Years and Ride the Wall." In 2011, this ride will be about 15 miles long and includes both the paved Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes and an unpaved high forest road. Riders normally range in age from about 8 to over 60.

Click on the small map to get a readable version in a separate window.

From the Enaville Resort, ride west along the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes, through Cataldo, and along the first couple of miles of the old CCC Road. The CCC Road begins to rise in elevation about where it runs adjacent to the Trail. The next several miles rise at a 6-7% grade. Many riders are able to climb the grade without stopping or walking their bicycle. However, this portion of the ride gives participants a fantastic opportunity to view of the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes, the Coeur d'Alene River, and the surrounding mountain scenery. Many riders stop to take pictures, and also catch their breath, while enjoying the view. The highest elevation of the ride occurs near the Wall Peak Road intersection. From this point it is all down hill. You can ride as fast, or slow, as your skill and courage will allow. This portion of the road can have loose dirt, rocks, and gravel so a moderate down hill pace is advised. Finally you cross over Old River Road and return along it to the Enaville Resort. A commemorative shirt and the BBQ come with the payment of the registration fee that benefits local charities.

All of this loop can be ridden at any time since the Trail and roads are open to the public. The loop trip can be started from either the Enaville Trailhead or the Cataldo Trailhead. Riders do need to be aware that they may encounter vehicles on the public roads. Logging trucks often use the CCC Road. If the loop is ridden in the reverse direction, where you climb upon leaving Enaville, extra caution should be taken on the down hill part of the ride: it can have some ruts and can result in faster speeds if the rider is not very careful.

click to enlarge this photo by Ed Renkey
meadow and trail from Wall Road
click to enlarge this photo by Ed Renkey
Coeur d'Alene River and trail between Enaville and Cataldo from Wall Road
 
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